Fauci’s History of Fake News: In 1983 He Accused Children of Spreading AIDS

Fauci’s History of Fake News: In 1983 He Accused Children of Spreading AIDS

By Vanesa Catanzaro

Amid the AIDS crisis of the 1980s, Anthony Fauci, the rising star of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) bureaucracy, promoted a misleading and unscientific theory that children could spread the syndrome within the family through close contact. The media quickly replicated this misinformation, triggering a national media frenzy and public panic, Great Game India reported.

Fauci promulgated this misleading hypothesis about the newly discovered little-known syndrome on 6 May 1983 in an article he published in JAMA Network, the monthly open-access medical journal published by the American Medical Association.

In that article, he also noted that the journal had published in the same issue a report documenting one of the first cases of the onset of immunodeficiency disease in an infant, raising “the possibility that routine close contact, such as within a family home, may spread the disease.”

“Researchers believe that sexual contact and blood transfusions can spread the disease. But “if non-sexual, non-blood transmission is possible, the scope of the syndrome could be enormous,” then “AIDS takes on a whole new dimension,” Fauci further wrote, fuelling bewilderment and alarm by putting an increasingly speculative spin on his theory.

The media were quick to immediately invoke Fauci’s claims and take them as their leading authority. After a nationally distributed report on the UPI wire entitled, “Household Contact Can Transmit AIDS,” other media outlets began a flurry of alarmist headlines, such as the Associated Press (AP) asking, “Is AIDS Spread by Routine Contact?”

Fauci’s theory was misleading, unsubstantiated, and soon refuted. Regarding the infant infection discussed in JAMA, which he used to base his hypothesis, it became known that it involved vertical transmission from mother to child during pregnancy. Moreover, HIV, the virus later linked to the cause of AIDS, is only transmitted by exposure to infected bodily fluids, such as blood, or by sexual contact, as the medical and scientific community officially maintains to this day.

But the damage was already done. Hundreds of newspapers spread the misleading theory of Fauci’s article, the media actively set to work fanning the alarm about the transmission of AIDS through simple routine contact.

Unfounded fears of the risk of transmission through simple contact became one of the most damaging missteps of the entire AIDS crisis.

Drawing a parallel with the COVID-19, otherwise known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP Virus) crisis. Several facts show Fauci to be a strategist of deception to carry out purposes that have to do with his economic interests.

One of these relevant facts was reported by TheBL in an article revealing how Fauci admittedly misled Americans into getting vaccinated without presenting supporting scientific support or prior correctly verified research. He reportedly receives a substantial commission on vaccine sales.

He has even been accused by several infectious disease experts, including Dr. Steven Hatfill, of discrediting and causing medical bureaucratic roadblocks preventing the use of drugs such as hydroxychloroquine, despite their actual efficacy against the CCP Virus. This again raises the NIH director’s interest in pushing for experimental vaccines.

Since the emergence of the CCP Virus, contradictions in its emergence and handling of the pandemic have become a distinguishing factor, raising concerns and uncertainty about what is true and what may be a sham for speculative purposes.

Original Source

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